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DrugBank Version 5.0

The DrugBank database is a unique bioinformatics and cheminformatics resource that combines detailed drug (i.e. chemical, pharmacological and pharmaceutical) data with comprehensive drug target (i.e. sequence, structure, and pathway) information. The database contains 8261 drug entries including 2021 FDA-approved small molecule drugs, 233 FDA-approved biotech (protein/peptide) drugs, 94 nutraceuticals and over 6000 experimental drugs. Additionally, 4338 non-redundant protein (i.e. drug target/enzyme/transporter/carrier) sequences are linked to these drug entries. Each DrugCard entry contains more than 200 data fields with half of the information being devoted to drug/chemical data and the other half devoted to drug target or protein data. More about DrugBank

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Citing DrugBank:
Wishart DS, Knox C, Guo AC, Shrivastava S, Hassanali M, Stothard P, Chang Z, Woolsey J. DrugBank: a comprehensive resource for in silico drug discovery and exploration. Nucleic Acids Res. 2006 Jan 1;34(Database issue):D668-72. 16381955

Drug of the day: Edoxaban

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Edoxaban is a member of the Novel Oral Anti-Coagulants (NOACs) class of drugs, and is a rapidly acting, oral, selective factor Xa inhibitor. By inhibiting factor Xa, a key protein in the coagulation cascade, edoxaban prevents the stepwise amplification of protein factors needed to form blood clots. It is indicated to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism (SE) in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) following 5-10 days of initial therapy with a parenteral anticoagulant. Traditionally, warfarin, a vitamin K antagonist, was used for stroke prevention in these individuals but effective use of this drug is limited by it's delayed onset, narrow therapeutic window, need for regular monitoring and INR testing, and numerous drug-drug and drug-food interactions. This has prompted enthusiasm for newer agents such as dabigatran, apixaban, and rivaroxaban for effective clot prevention. In addition to once daily dosing, the benefits over warfarin also include significant reductions in hemorrhagic stroke and GI bleeding, and improved compliance, which is beneficial as many patients will be on lifelong therapy.

Edoxaban is indicated to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism (SE) in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). However, it should not be used in patients with creatinine clearance (CrCL) > 95 mL/min because of increased risk of ischemic stroke compared to warfarin at the highest dose studied (60 mg). It is also indicated for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) following 5-10 days of initial therapy with a parenteral anticoagulant.

Learn more about Edoxaban