Human cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cell

Identification

Name
Human cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cell
Accession Number
DB11054
Type
Biotech
Groups
Approved
Biologic Classification
Protein Based Therapies
Haematopoietic growth factors
Description

Human cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells consist of hematopoietic progenitor cells, monocytes, lymphocytes, and granulocytes from human cord blood. They are used during allogeneic unrelated and related hematopoietic stem cell transplantation procedures in patients with disorders affecting the hematopoietic system that are inherited, acquired, or result from myeloablative treatment. Human umbilical cord is a rich source of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells that are capable of proliferation in vitro. Active and viable hematopoietic progenitor cells, or hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) express the cell surface marker CD34 which is critical for cell identification [1]. Upon division and maturation at the bone marrow following intravenous administration to the patient, hematopoietic progenitor cells enter the systemic circulation to restore blood counts and function [Label].

After the first cord blood transplant in 1988 in a patient with Fanconi anemia [3], the use of umbilical cord blood transplantation was increased in clinical settings. Human cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells can be collected from both related or unrelated donors. The unrelated donor transplant setting has several advantages over related donor transplant and bone marrow transplantation; it allows shorter time to transplant and tolerance of 1–2 human leukocyte antigen mismatch due to expanded donor pool, which increases the chance of finding a suitable donor, particularly in patients requiring urgent transplantation [2]. Other advantages of HSC transplantation include a lower risk of transmitting infections by latent viruses and improved targeting of ethnic minorities increased pool of rare haplotypes [2]. Umbilical cord blood cell transplantation was also associated with reduced incidence and severity of graft versus host disease (GVHD) thus improved survival rates of transplant patients compared to allogeneic bone marrow transplant setting, which may be due to "naive" nature of lymphocytes [4]. Hemacord is marketed in the U.S. as an allogeneic cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cell therapy for intravenous use.

Protein chemical formula
Not Available
Protein average weight
Not Available
Sequences
Not Available
Synonyms
Not Available
Prescription Products
NameDosageStrengthRouteLabellerMarketing StartMarketing End
HemaCordInjection500000000 1/25mLIntravenousNew York Blood Center2011-11-10Not applicableUs
Categories
UNII
XU53VK93MC
CAS number
Not Available

Pharmacology

Indication

Indicated for use in unrelated donor hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation procedures in conjunction with an appropriate preparative regimen for hematopoietic and immunologic reconstitution in patients with disorders affecting the hematopoietic system that are inherited, acquired, or result from myeloablative treatment [Label].

Pharmacodynamics

Human cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells constitute the hematopoietic progenitor cells, monocytes, lymphocytes, and granulocytes that are isolated from red blood cells and plasma volume that are collected from the human umbilical cord and placenta [Label]. According to the findings of retrospective data reviews and a single-arm prospective study, patients with hematologic malignancy who are receiving human cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation achieved recovery of neutrophil counts, platelet counts, erythrocyte counts at rates of 76-83 %, 57-77 %, and 46-77 %, respectively [Label].

Mechanism of action

Upon collection, the blood from human umbilical cord or placenta volume reduced and partially depleted of red blood cells and plasma. The remaining cells consist of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), monocytes, lymphocytes, and granulocytes. HPCs express the CD34 surface antigen; this allows distinct identification and characterization of those cells. With the evidence of CD34+ cells being able to engraft, CD34+ cells have been selected and widely used both for human autologous and allogeneic transplantations [1].

Human cord blood HPCs, that are intravenously administered, travel to the bone marrow of the transplant recipient where they undergo cell division and maturation. Mature cells are then released from the bone marrow where they enter the systemic bloodstream to circulate and travel to tissue sites. Mature cells serve to partially or fully restore hematologic function in patients with hematologic disorders by improving the counts and function of blood-borne cell, including immune cells, that originate from the bone marrow [Label]. It is also suggested that mature leukocytes from HPC transplantation may synthesize enzymes that are able to circulate and improve cellular functions of some native tissues in patients with enzymatic abnormalities arising from types of storage disorders. Clear mechanism of this effect is not fully elucidated [Label].

Absorption

Intravenous administration achieves complete bioavailability.

Volume of distribution

Pharmacokinetic parameters do not apply for human cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells.

Protein binding

Pharmacokinetic parameters do not apply for human cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells.

Metabolism

Pharmacokinetic parameters do not apply for human cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells.

Route of elimination

Pharmacokinetic parameters do not apply for human cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells.

Half life

Pharmacokinetic parameters do not apply for human cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells.

Clearance

Pharmacokinetic parameters do not apply for human cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells.

Toxicity

There has been no cases of overdose with human cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cell therapy, and single doses up to 57.6 x 107 TNC/kg have been administered. Higher doses of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in the infusion mixture may induce altered mental status and coma. For DMSO overdosage, general supportive care is recommended [Label].

Affected organisms
Not Available
Pathways
Not Available
Pharmacogenomic Effects/ADRs
Not Available

Interactions

Drug Interactions
Not Available
Food Interactions
Not Available

References

General References
  1. da Silva CL, Goncalves R, Porada CD, Ascensao JL, Zanjani ED, Cabral JM, Almeida-Porada G: Differences amid bone marrow and cord blood hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell division kinetics. J Cell Physiol. 2009 Jul;220(1):102-11. doi: 10.1002/jcp.21736. [PubMed:19277981]
  2. Rocha V, Gluckman E: Clinical use of umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2006 Jan;12(1 Suppl 1):34-41. doi: 10.1016/j.bbmt.2005.09.006. [PubMed:16399582]
  3. Gluckman E, Rocha V: History of the clinical use of umbilical cord blood hematopoietic cells. Cytotherapy. 2005;7(3):219-27. doi: 10.1080/14653240510027136. [PubMed:16081348]
  4. Bojanic I, Golubic Cepulic B: [Umbilical cord blood as a source of stem cells]. Acta Med Croatica. 2006 Jun;60(3):215-25. [PubMed:16933834]
External Links
PubChem Substance
347911095
FDA label
Download (4.36 MB)

Clinical Trials

Clinical Trials
Not Available

Pharmacoeconomics

Manufacturers
Not Available
Packagers
Not Available
Dosage forms
FormRouteStrength
InjectionIntravenous500000000 1/25mL
Prices
Not Available
Patents
Not Available

Properties

State
Not Available
Experimental Properties
Not Available

Taxonomy

Description
Not Available
Kingdom
Organic Compounds
Super Class
Organic Acids
Class
Carboxylic Acids and Derivatives
Sub Class
Amino Acids, Peptides, and Analogues
Direct Parent
Peptides
Alternative Parents
Not Available
Substituents
Not Available
Molecular Framework
Not Available
External Descriptors
Not Available

Drug created on December 01, 2015 13:05 / Updated on October 01, 2018 14:55