Identification
NameAbatacept
Accession NumberDB01281
TypeBiotech
GroupsApproved
Description

Abatacept is a soluble fusion protein, which links the extracellular domain of human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) to the modified Fc (hinge, CH2, and CH3 domains) portion of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1). Structurally, abatacept is a glycosylated fusion protein with a MALDI-MS molecular weight of 92,300 Da and it is a homodimer of two homologous polypeptide chains of 357 amino acids each. It is produced through recombinant DNA technology in mammalian CHO cells. The drug has activity as a selective co-stimulation modulator with inhibitory activity on T lymphocytes. Although approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, Repligen has entered a slightly different formulation of CTLA4-Ig into clinical trials (RG2077).

Protein structureNo structure small
Related Articles
Protein chemical formulaC3498H5458N922O1090S32
Protein average weight92300.0 Da (with glycosylation)
Sequences
>Abatacept monomer sequence
MHVAQPAVVLASSRGIASFVCEYASPGKATEVRVTVLRQADSQVTEVCAATYMMGNELTF
LDDSICTGTSSGNQVNLTIQGLRAMDTGLYICKVELMYPPPYYLGIGNGTQIYVIDPEPC
PDSDQEPKSSDKTHTSPPSPAPELLGGSSVFLFPPKPKDTLMISRTPEVTCVVVDVSHED
PEVKFNWYVDGVEVHNAKTKPREEQYNSTYRVVSVLTVLHQDWLNGKEYKCKVSNKALPA
PIEKTISKAKGQPREPQVYTLPPSRDELTKNQVSLTCLVKGFYPSDIAVEWESNGQPENN
YKTTPPVLDSDGSFFLYSKLTVDKSRWQQGNVFSCSVMHEALHNHYTQKSLSLSPGK
Download FASTA Format
Synonyms
Abatacept recombinant
External IDs BMS-188667 / CTLA4-IGG4M / RG-1046 / RG-2077 / RG1046 / RG2077
Product Ingredients Not Available
Approved Prescription Products
NameDosageStrengthRouteLabellerMarketing StartMarketing End
OrenciaPowder, for solution250 mgIntravenousBristol Myers Squibb2006-08-08Not applicableCanada
OrenciaInjection, solution125 mg/mLSubcutaneousE.R. Squibb & Sons, L.L.C.2011-07-29Not applicableUs
OrenciaInjection, solution87.5 mg/.7mLSubcutaneousE.R. Squibb & Sons, L.L.C.2011-07-29Not applicableUs
OrenciaSolution125 mgSubcutaneousBristol Myers Squibb2013-05-09Not applicableCanada
OrenciaSolution125 mgSubcutaneousBristol Myers SquibbNot applicableNot applicableCanada
OrenciaInjection, powder, lyophilized, for solution250 mg/15mLIntravenousE.R. Squibb & Sons, L.L.C.2009-01-01Not applicableUs
OrenciaInjection, solution50 mg/.4mLSubcutaneousE.R. Squibb & Sons, L.L.C.2011-07-29Not applicableUs
Approved Generic Prescription ProductsNot Available
Approved Over the Counter ProductsNot Available
Unapproved/Other Products Not Available
International BrandsNot Available
Brand mixturesNot Available
Categories
UNII7D0YB67S97
CAS number332348-12-6
Pharmacology
Indication

For the management of the signs and symptoms of moderate-to-severe active rheumatoid arthritis, inducing major clinical response, slowing the progression of structural damage, and improving physical function in adult patients. It is indicated both as a monotherapy and for use in combination with a continued regimen of DMARDs (not including TNF antagonists). Also used for the management of the signs and symptoms of moderately to severely active polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis in children.

Structured Indications
Pharmacodynamics

Abatacept is the first in a new class of drugs known as Selective Co-stimulation Modulators. Known as a recombinant fusion protein, the drug consists of the extracellular domain of human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) linked to a modified Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1. The Fc portion of the drug consists of the hinge region, the CH2 domain, and the CH3 domain of IgG1. Although there are multiple pathways and cell types involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, evidence suggests that T-cell activation may play an important role in the immunopathology of the disease. Ordinarily, full T-cell activation requires binding of the T-cell receptor to an antigen-MHC complex on the antigen-presenting cell as well as a co-stimulatory signal provided by the binding of the CD28 protein on the surface of the T-cell with the CD80/86 proteins on the surface of the antigen-presenting cell. CTLA4 is a naturally occurring protein which is expressed on the surface of T-cells some hours or days after full T-cell activation and is capable of binding to CD80/86 on antigen-presenting cells with much greater affinity than CD28. Binding of CTLA4-Ig to CD80/86 provides a negative feedback mechanism which results in T-cell deactivation. Abatacept was developed by Bristol-Myers-Squibb and is licensed in the US for the treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis in the case of inadequate response to anti-TNF-alpha therapy.

Mechanism of action

Abatacept is a selective costimulation modulator, like CTLA-4, the drug has shown to inhibit T-cell (T lymphocyte) activation by binding to CD80 and CD86, thereby blocking interaction with CD28. Blockade of this interaction has been shown to inhibit the delivery of the second co-stimulatory signal required for optimal activation of T-cells. This results in the inhibition of autoimmune T-Cell activation that has been implcated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

TargetKindPharmacological actionActionsOrganismUniProt ID
T-lymphocyte activation antigen CD80Proteinyes
antagonist
HumanP33681 details
T-lymphocyte activation antigen CD86Proteinyes
antagonist
HumanP42081 details
Related Articles
Absorption

When a single 10 mg/kg intravenous infusion of abatacept is administered in healthy subjects, the peak plasma concentration (Cmax) was 292 mcg/mL. When multiple doses of 10 mg/kg was given to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, the Cmax was 295 mcg/mL. The bioavailability of abatacept following subcutaneous administration relative to intravenous administration is 78.6%.

Volume of distribution
  • 0.07 L/kg [RA Patients, IV administration]
  • 0.09 L/kg [Healthy Subjects, IV administration]
  • 0.11 L/kg [RA patients, subcutaneous administration]
Protein bindingNot Available
MetabolismNot Available
Route of elimination

kidney and liver

Half life

16.7 (12-23) days in healthy subjects; 13.1 (8-25) days in RA subjects; 14.3 days when subcutaneously administered to adult RA patients.

Clearance
  • 0.23 mL/h/kg [Healthy Subjects after 10 mg/kg Intravenous Infusion]
  • 0.22 mL/h/kg [RA Patients after multiple 10 mg/kg Intravenous Infusions]
  • 0.4 mL/h/kg [juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients]. The mean systemic clearance is 0.28 mL/h/kg when a subcutaneously administered to adult RA patients. The clearance of abatacept increases with increasing body weight.
Toxicity

Most common adverse events (≥10%) are headache, upper respiratory tract infection, nasopharyngitis, and nausea. Doses up to 50 mg/kg have been administered without apparent toxic effect.

Affected organisms
  • Humans and other mammals
PathwaysNot Available
Pharmacogenomic Effects/ADRs Not Available
Interactions
Drug Interactions
DrugInteractionDrug group
AdalimumabThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Adalimumab is combined with Abatacept.Approved
AfelimomabThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Afelimomab is combined with Abatacept.Investigational
AnakinraThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Anakinra is combined with Abatacept.Approved
BelimumabThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Abatacept is combined with Belimumab.Approved
Certolizumab pegolThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Certolizumab pegol is combined with Abatacept.Approved
DenosumabThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Denosumab is combined with Abatacept.Approved
EtanerceptThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Etanercept is combined with Abatacept.Approved, Investigational
FingolimodAbatacept may increase the immunosuppressive activities of Fingolimod.Approved, Investigational
G17DTThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Abatacept is combined with G17DT.Investigational
GolimumabThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Golimumab is combined with Abatacept.Approved
InfliximabThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Infliximab is combined with Abatacept.Approved
INGN 201The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Abatacept is combined with INGN 201.Investigational
INGN 225The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Abatacept is combined with INGN 225.Investigational
LeflunomideThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Abatacept is combined with Leflunomide.Approved, Investigational
NatalizumabThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Abatacept is combined with Natalizumab.Approved, Investigational
PimecrolimusThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Pimecrolimus is combined with Abatacept.Approved, Investigational
PirfenidoneThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Pirfenidone is combined with Abatacept.Investigational
RindopepimutThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Abatacept is combined with CDX-110.Investigational
RituximabThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Rituximab is combined with Abatacept.Approved
RoflumilastRoflumilast may increase the immunosuppressive activities of Abatacept.Approved
Sipuleucel-TThe therapeutic efficacy of Sipuleucel-T can be decreased when used in combination with Abatacept.Approved
SRP 299The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Abatacept is combined with SRP 299.Investigational
TacrolimusThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Tacrolimus is combined with Abatacept.Approved, Investigational
TocilizumabThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Tocilizumab is combined with Abatacept.Approved
TofacitinibThe risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Abatacept is combined with Tofacitinib.Approved, Investigational
TrastuzumabTrastuzumab may increase the neutropenic activities of Abatacept.Approved, Investigational
Food InteractionsNot Available
References
Synthesis Reference

Sang-Lin Kim, Hyun-Kwang Tan, Sang-Min Lim, Wuk-Sang Ryu, Hahn-Sun Jung, Song-Jae Lee, Cheon-Ik Park, Seung-Hoon Kang, Dong Il Kim, "Plant Recombinant Human CTLA4IG and a Method for Producing the Same." U.S. Patent US20100189717, issued July 29, 2010.

US20100189717
General References
  1. Dall'Era M, Davis J: CTLA4Ig: a novel inhibitor of costimulation. Lupus. 2004;13(5):372-6. [PubMed:15230295 ]
  2. Moreland L, Bate G, Kirkpatrick P: Abatacept. Nat Rev Drug Discov. 2006 Mar;5(3):185-6. [PubMed:16557658 ]
  3. Weisman MH, Durez P, Hallegua D, Aranda R, Becker JC, Nuamah I, Vratsanos G, Zhou Y, Moreland LW: Reduction of inflammatory biomarker response by abatacept in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. J Rheumatol. 2006 Nov;33(11):2162-6. Epub 2006 Oct 1. [PubMed:17014006 ]
  4. Weyand CM, Goronzy JJ: T-cell-targeted therapies in rheumatoid arthritis. Nat Clin Pract Rheumatol. 2006 Apr;2(4):201-10. [PubMed:16932686 ]
  5. Scheinfeld N: Abatacept: A review of a new biologic agent for refractory rheumatoid arthritis for dermatologists. J Dermatolog Treat. 2006;17(4):229-34. [PubMed:16971318 ]
  6. Maxwell LJ, Singh JA: Abatacept for rheumatoid arthritis: a Cochrane systematic review. J Rheumatol. 2010 Feb;37(2):234-45. doi: 10.3899/jrheum.091066. Epub 2010 Jan 15. [PubMed:20080922 ]
  7. Maxwell L, Singh JA: Abatacept for rheumatoid arthritis. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009 Oct 7;(4):CD007277. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD007277.pub2. [PubMed:19821401 ]
  8. Nogid A, Pham DQ: Role of abatacept in the management of rheumatoid arthritis. Clin Ther. 2006 Nov;28(11):1764-78. [PubMed:17212998 ]
  9. Hervey PS, Keam SJ: Abatacept. BioDrugs. 2006;20(1):53-61; discussion 62. [PubMed:16573350 ]
  10. Reynolds J, Shojania K, Marra CA: Abatacept: a novel treatment for moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis. Pharmacotherapy. 2007 Dec;27(12):1693-701. [PubMed:18041889 ]
External Links
ATC CodesL04AA24 — Abatacept
AHFS Codes
  • 92:00.00
PDB EntriesNot Available
FDA labelDownload (108 KB)
MSDSNot Available
Clinical Trials
Clinical Trials
PhaseStatusPurposeConditionsCount
0RecruitingTreatmentMyasthenia Gravis1
1Active Not RecruitingTreatmentRheumatoid Arthritis1
1CompletedNot AvailableRheumatoid Arthritis1
1CompletedTreatmentDisseminated Sclerosis / Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS)1
1CompletedTreatmentHealthy Volunteers1
1CompletedTreatmentNephritis, Lupus1
1CompletedTreatmentPsoriasis Vulgaris2
1CompletedTreatmentRelapsing Polychondritis1
1CompletedTreatmentRheumatoid Arthritis3
1RecruitingBasic ScienceHealthy Volunteers1
1RecruitingSupportive CareChediak Higashi Syndrome / Chediak-Higashi Syndrome / Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) / Congenital Hypoplastic Anemia / Diamond Blackfan Anemia / Dyskeratosis Congenita / Dyskeratosis-congenita / Glanzmann Thrombasthenia / Hurler's Syndrome / Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency / Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic / Severe Aplastic Anemia (SAA) / Severe Congenital Neutropenia / Shwachman Diamond Syndrome / Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome / Sickle Cell Disorders / Thalassaemic disorders / Thalassemia Major (TM) / Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WAS)1
1RecruitingTreatmentChronic Graft Versus Host Disease1
1RecruitingTreatmentGraft Versus Host Disease (GVHD) / Sickle Cell Disorders1
1RecruitingTreatmentVitiligo1
1WithdrawnNot AvailableRheumatoid Arthritis1
1, 2CompletedTreatmentDiffuse Systemic Sclerosis / Scleroderma, Systemic1
1, 2CompletedTreatmentGranulomatosis With Polyangiitis1
1, 2CompletedTreatmentLupus Erythematosus, Systemic / Nephritis, Lupus1
1, 2CompletedTreatmentRheumatoid Arthritis2
1, 2CompletedTreatmentUrticarias1
1, 2RecruitingTreatmentSystemic Lupus Erythematosus Arthritis1
2Active Not RecruitingTreatmentAlopecia Areata (AA)1
2Active Not RecruitingTreatmentDiffuse Cutaneous Systemic Sclerosis1
2Active Not RecruitingTreatmentPsoriasis1
2Active Not RecruitingTreatmentUveitis1
2CompletedNot AvailableRheumatoid Arthritis1
2CompletedBasic ScienceAsthma, Allergic1
2CompletedPreventionSystemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)1
2CompletedTreatmentDiabetes, Diabetes Mellitus Type 12
2CompletedTreatmentGiant Cells Arteritis / Takayasu's Disease1
2CompletedTreatmentLupus Erythematosus, Systemic / Nephritis, Lupus1
2CompletedTreatmentPsoriasis Vulgaris1
2CompletedTreatmentRelapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS)1
2CompletedTreatmentRheumatoid Arthritis3
2Not Yet RecruitingTreatmentInterstitial Lung Disease (ILD) / Rheumatoid Arthritis1
2RecruitingPreventionAbnormal Glucose Tolerance / Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus Type 11
2RecruitingPreventionGraft Versus Host Disease (GVHD) / Malignancies1
2RecruitingTreatmentGlomerulonephritis minimal lesion1
2RecruitingTreatmentSystemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)1
2TerminatedPreventionANCA-Associated Vasculitis (AAV)1
2TerminatedTreatmentDisseminated Sclerosis1
2TerminatedTreatmentHypertensive1
2TerminatedTreatmentPsoriatic Arthritis1
2TerminatedTreatmentSarcoidosis1
2Unknown StatusTreatmentAll / AML / Biphenotypic Leukemia / MDS Associated With Isolated Del (5q) / Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Unclassified / Refractory Anemia / Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts-1 (5-10% Blasts) / Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts-2 (10-20% Blasts) / Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts / Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia / Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts / Undifferentiated Leukemia1
2Unknown StatusTreatmentAnkylosing Spondylitis (AS)1
2Unknown StatusTreatmentDermatomyositis / Polymyositis1
2WithdrawnTreatmentAlopecia Areata (AA)1
2WithdrawnTreatmentAlopecia Totalis/Universalis1
2WithdrawnTreatmentInflammatory Arthritis / Primary Sjogren's Syndrome / Rheumatoid Arthritis / Secondary Sjogren's Syndrome1
2, 3CompletedTreatmentRheumatoid Arthritis2
2, 3TerminatedTreatmentSystemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)1
3Active Not RecruitingTreatmentActive Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (pJIA)1
3Active Not RecruitingTreatmentJuvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA)1
3Active Not RecruitingTreatmentNephritis, Lupus1
3Active Not RecruitingTreatmentPsoriatic Arthritis1
3Active Not RecruitingTreatmentRheumatoid Arthritis1
3CompletedNot AvailableRheumatoid Arthritis1
3CompletedPreventionRheumatoid Arthritis1
3CompletedTreatmentActive Rheumatoid Arthritis1
3CompletedTreatmentArthritis, Juvenile Rheumatoid1
3CompletedTreatmentRheumatoid Arthritis18
3CompletedTreatmentUlcerative Colitis (UC)1
3Not Yet RecruitingTreatmentGiant Cells Arteritis1
3RecruitingTreatmentANCA-Associated Vasculitis (AAV) / Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis / Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Wegener's)1
3RecruitingTreatmentArthralgia / Arthritis1
3RecruitingTreatmentAutoimmune Necrotizing Myopathy / Dermatomyositis / Juvenile Myositis Above the Age of 18 / Overlap Myositis / Polymyositis1
3RecruitingTreatmentJuvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA)1
3RecruitingTreatmentRheumatoid Arthritis2
3RecruitingTreatmentSjogrens Disease1
3RecruitingTreatmentSjögren's Syndrome1
3TerminatedTreatmentCrohn's Disease (CD)1
4Active Not RecruitingTreatmentPrimary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC)1
4Active Not RecruitingTreatmentRheumatoid Arthritis2
4CompletedTreatmentRheumatoid Arthritis2
4Not Yet RecruitingTreatmentRheumatoid Arthritis1
4RecruitingBasic ScienceRheumatoid Arthritis2
4RecruitingTreatmentDermatomyositis1
4RecruitingTreatmentRheumatoid Arthritis4
4WithdrawnTreatmentApoptotic DNA Damage / Rheumatoid Arthritis / T-cell Lymphocytosis1
Not AvailableActive Not RecruitingNot AvailableRheumatoid Arthritis1
Not AvailableActive Not RecruitingTreatmentFemale Patients With Behcet's Syndrome1
Not AvailableCompletedNot AvailableRheumatoid Arthritis7
Not AvailableNot Yet RecruitingNot AvailableRheumatoid Arthritis2
Not AvailableRecruitingNot AvailableAnkylosing Spondylitis (AS) / Psoriatic Arthritis / Rheumatoid Arthritis1
Not AvailableRecruitingNot AvailableRheumatoid Arthritis1
Not AvailableRecruitingPreventionRheumatoid Arthritis1
Not AvailableRecruitingTreatmentChronic Hepatitis B Infection / Rheumatoid Arthritis1
Not AvailableUnknown StatusNot AvailableRheumatoid Arthritis1
Not AvailableWithdrawnNot AvailablePatients Diagnosed With a Rheumatoid Arthritis According to ACR Criteria (American College of Rheumatology) / Rheumatoid Arthritis1
Pharmacoeconomics
ManufacturersNot Available
Packagers
Dosage forms
FormRouteStrength
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous250 mg/15mL
Injection, solutionSubcutaneous125 mg/mL
Injection, solutionSubcutaneous50 mg/.4mL
Injection, solutionSubcutaneous87.5 mg/.7mL
Powder, for solutionIntravenous250 mg
SolutionSubcutaneous125 mg
PricesNot Available
Patents
Patent NumberPediatric ExtensionApprovedExpires (estimated)
CA2110518 No2007-05-222012-06-16Canada
Properties
StateLiquid
Experimental PropertiesNot Available
Taxonomy
DescriptionNot Available
KingdomOrganic Compounds
Super ClassOrganic Acids
ClassCarboxylic Acids and Derivatives
Sub ClassAmino Acids, Peptides, and Analogues
Direct ParentPeptides
Alternative ParentsNot Available
SubstituentsNot Available
Molecular FrameworkNot Available
External DescriptorsNot Available

Targets

Kind
Protein
Organism
Human
Pharmacological action
yes
Actions
antagonist
General Function:
Virus receptor activity
Specific Function:
Involved in the costimulatory signal essential for T-lymphocyte activation. T-cell proliferation and cytokine production is induced by the binding of CD28, binding to CTLA-4 has opposite effects and inhibits T-cell activation.(Microbial infection) Acts as a receptor for adenovirus subgroup B.
Gene Name:
CD80
Uniprot ID:
P33681
Molecular Weight:
33047.625 Da
References
  1. Kremer JM: Selective costimulation modulators: a novel approach for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. J Clin Rheumatol. 2005 Jun;11(3 Suppl):S55-62. [PubMed:16357751 ]
  2. Weyand CM, Goronzy JJ: T-cell-targeted therapies in rheumatoid arthritis. Nat Clin Pract Rheumatol. 2006 Apr;2(4):201-10. [PubMed:16932686 ]
  3. Scheinfeld N: Abatacept: A review of a new biologic agent for refractory rheumatoid arthritis for dermatologists. J Dermatolog Treat. 2006;17(4):229-34. [PubMed:16971318 ]
  4. Vincenti F, Luggen M: T cell costimulation: a rational target in the therapeutic armamentarium for autoimmune diseases and transplantation. Annu Rev Med. 2007;58:347-58. [PubMed:17020493 ]
  5. Maxwell LJ, Singh JA: Abatacept for rheumatoid arthritis: a Cochrane systematic review. J Rheumatol. 2010 Feb;37(2):234-45. doi: 10.3899/jrheum.091066. Epub 2010 Jan 15. [PubMed:20080922 ]
  6. Nogid A, Pham DQ: Role of abatacept in the management of rheumatoid arthritis. Clin Ther. 2006 Nov;28(11):1764-78. [PubMed:17212998 ]
  7. Hervey PS, Keam SJ: Abatacept. BioDrugs. 2006;20(1):53-61; discussion 62. [PubMed:16573350 ]
  8. Reynolds J, Shojania K, Marra CA: Abatacept: a novel treatment for moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis. Pharmacotherapy. 2007 Dec;27(12):1693-701. [PubMed:18041889 ]
  9. Chen X, Ji ZL, Chen YZ: TTD: Therapeutic Target Database. Nucleic Acids Res. 2002 Jan 1;30(1):412-5. [PubMed:11752352 ]
Kind
Protein
Organism
Human
Pharmacological action
yes
Actions
antagonist
General Function:
Virus receptor activity
Specific Function:
Receptor involved in the costimulatory signal essential for T-lymphocyte proliferation and interleukin-2 production, by binding CD28 or CTLA-4. May play a critical role in the early events of T-cell activation and costimulation of naive T-cells, such as deciding between immunity and anergy that is made by T-cells within 24 hours after activation. Isoform 2 interferes with the formation of CD86 ...
Gene Name:
CD86
Uniprot ID:
P42081
Molecular Weight:
37681.97 Da
References
  1. Scheinfeld N: Abatacept: A review of a new biologic agent for refractory rheumatoid arthritis for dermatologists. J Dermatolog Treat. 2006;17(4):229-34. [PubMed:16971318 ]
  2. Vincenti F, Luggen M: T cell costimulation: a rational target in the therapeutic armamentarium for autoimmune diseases and transplantation. Annu Rev Med. 2007;58:347-58. [PubMed:17020493 ]
  3. Kremer JM: Selective costimulation modulators: a novel approach for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. J Clin Rheumatol. 2005 Jun;11(3 Suppl):S55-62. [PubMed:16357751 ]
  4. Weyand CM, Goronzy JJ: T-cell-targeted therapies in rheumatoid arthritis. Nat Clin Pract Rheumatol. 2006 Apr;2(4):201-10. [PubMed:16932686 ]
  5. Maxwell LJ, Singh JA: Abatacept for rheumatoid arthritis: a Cochrane systematic review. J Rheumatol. 2010 Feb;37(2):234-45. doi: 10.3899/jrheum.091066. Epub 2010 Jan 15. [PubMed:20080922 ]
  6. Nogid A, Pham DQ: Role of abatacept in the management of rheumatoid arthritis. Clin Ther. 2006 Nov;28(11):1764-78. [PubMed:17212998 ]
  7. Hervey PS, Keam SJ: Abatacept. BioDrugs. 2006;20(1):53-61; discussion 62. [PubMed:16573350 ]
  8. Reynolds J, Shojania K, Marra CA: Abatacept: a novel treatment for moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis. Pharmacotherapy. 2007 Dec;27(12):1693-701. [PubMed:18041889 ]
  9. Chen X, Ji ZL, Chen YZ: TTD: Therapeutic Target Database. Nucleic Acids Res. 2002 Jan 1;30(1):412-5. [PubMed:11752352 ]
Drug created on May 16, 2007 16:55 / Updated on June 08, 2017 13:22